Volunteer to Participate in a Clinical Trial to Tackle RSV

Learn more about participating in a clinical trial for an investigational messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccine to prevent respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, a common respiratory virus, when given alone or with an
investigational COVID-19 booster vaccination targeting currently circulating variants. Currently, there are no approved treatments or vaccines for RSV.

Learn more about participating in a clinical trial for an investigational messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccine to prevent respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, a common respiratory virus, when given alone or with an investigational COVID-19 booster vaccination targeting currently circulating variants. Currently, there are no approved treatments or vaccines for RSV.

Diseases do not discriminate—and neither should clinical trials Moderna is committed to researching safe and effective mRNA-based vaccines and therapies to bring better health and living to people of all ages, sexes, and backgrounds.

RSV causes about
177,000 hospitalizations and 14,000 deaths in the U.S. annually in those over the age of 65. 1

RSV is the second leading cause of significant respiratory tract illnesses in adults, behind only influenza (flu).  2

Who Can Join the RSVictory-COVID Trial?

To join, you must be:

  • 50 years of age or older
  • Fully vaccinated for COVID-19 per CDC guidelines
  • In good health (Certain chronic diseases such as heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may be permissible)
  • Primarily responsible for self-care (you do not require a caretaker)

Other criteria may apply in order to be eligible.
By participating in this clinical trial, you will be advancing research that may potentially change the future of RSV prevention.

References:1. Falsey AR, Hennessey PA, Formica MA, Cox C, Walsh EE.Respiratory syncytial virus infection in elderly and high-risk adults.N Engl J Med. 2005;352(17):1749-1759. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa0439512. Falsey AR, Walsh EE. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in elderlyadults. Drugs Aging. 2005;22(7):577-587. doi:10.2165/00002512-200522070-00004

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